HTML5 Canvas CRT Filter

Note: This may be the coolest thing I’ve ever done.

So, over the last couple of weeks I’ve been a bit obsesed with the idea of CRT filters. The concept involves making the graphics look like they’re being displayed on a CRT T.V. by adding in color distortion, scan lines and bloom.

It all started with wanting to get a small CRT T.V. to play the SNES on, I saw one leaving Sean’s and couldn’t stop thinking about the idea of how old games look better on old T.V.s. From there it evolved into the fact that, eventually, there will be no functional CRT T.V.s anywhere, which made me a little sad, I really think some games look better when being displayed via CRT. Then, the idea of simply having an algorithm to reproduce CRT output came up, I was curious the algorithm needed to do something like that. The new Street Fighter III: Third Strike on PSN/Xbox has this option and I was curious if it was accurate or not (did they just put black lines every other pixel to represent scan lines or did color from the surrounding pixels bleed into the scan line like it should be).

I found an algorithm which involves looping through each pixel and applying different RGB transformations to the values (I tried to port this to JavaScript properly…I’m sure there are errors):

http://board.byuu.org/viewtopic.php?f=10&t=147&start=150

And to manage a pixel by pixel analysis of whats on the screen in HTML5 / Canvas:

https://github.com/flother/examples/blob/gh-pages/canvas-blur/v1/canvas-image.js

Then I added in a character class, animation and game loop. I also created a horrible rainbow colored character to move around the screen so you can see performance, and went with a Super Metroid background image to easily see the graphical change.

I don’t claim this is the best, most efficient way to do a CRT filter (I’m sure it’s not). The image is 256 x 224 (SNES resolution) multiplied by 2 (512 x 448). Be sure to note the horrible impact on performance (each update it loops through each pixel and provides a transformation). Should be 10 FPS but with the filter that doesn’t work out.

WARNING: This will only work in modern browsers (seems best on Chrome) and may crash your browser:

http://awesomeradicalgaming.com/html5-canvas-crt-filter/

Click “CRT Filter Off/On” to turn the filter off and on.

If you’re interested, inspect the source on the page. The JavaScript is right on it and I tried to comment everything. The original code is in…Mathlab or something (why is someone doing this in Mathlab?), basically they’re porting it to SNES emulators, and some of the lines didn’t make sense, such as:

(ScaleTimes.*linspace(0, 1, 255).^(1/2.2)) + ScaleAdd

Which is basically a value * array which…I’m not sure if every element in the array is multiplied or what.

linspace() is also an interesting function I’ve never seen before, that should have converted properly (linearly spaced array values from x to y for z elements).

Finally:

InterpolatedImage[x, y + 1].red = ScanRange[max(i.red) + 1] * i.red // assign dark scanline values based on brightness of pixel above
InterpolatedImage[x, y + 1].green = ScanRange[max(i.red) + 1] * i.green
InterpolatedImage[x, y + 1].blue = ScanRange[max(i.red) + 1] * i.blue

May have not converted properly. Not sure what the max is doing (it’s a single value, how can max() do anything for one value, also why does it use red’s value as the transformation each time).

I tried to improve performance by removing the 4 loops and just having one loop. Then, every other line it either does a normal transformation or a scan line transformation.

The ghosting is being generated because of the vertical scan lines but…I’m not really sure why. The vertical scan lines effect vertical pixels not horizontal ones.

In general I’m not really sure how they came to the conclusion to use those transformations, but it works. I mostly just ported it to HTML5.

Update:

I’ve put the source up on Github here: https://github.com/mikeradvak/html-5-canvas-crt-filter and you can see a working example here: http://mikeradvak.github.io/html-5-canvas-crt-filter/.

7 thoughts on “HTML5 Canvas CRT Filter”

  1. Hot damn. This is some beautiful stuff. I was originally in the neighborhood for some scanlines, but this is pretty nice too.

  2. Gaming on Cathode Ray tube (CRT) is very harmful for the human eye, This step of CRT filter will be really favorable for the people who play games on CRT.
    r4i card

  3. Ich hab hier das andere Extrem Рsoviele sch̦ne Kleidung (finde ich), aber leider nicht rosa, daher untragbar. Und ich kann diese Farbe nicht mehr sehen. Sollte es bei Tertia eintreffen, werde ich dich nochmal daran erinnern, dass du es so wolltest ;-)Und warum &qotr;gestuiges Desaster"? War doch toll! :-P

  4. Auii!iuigiir!! Mi ero perso il compleanno. Su, dai, 30 non sono tanti. Pensa che io, quando voglio sentirmi giovane, devo pensare che mia figlia ancora non ne ha venti!

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